23 Apr

Tex Murphy Radio Theater and DOSBox Guides – The Recap!

deadend

I guess we’ve come to the end of the road with Tex for now. Simply some of the best adventure games ever made–without question. And honestly, I’m sad to see them all done. But, hey, we got them all running very well on Windows XP. Here are the guides, click on the box art to jump directly to the post:

tex_mstex_mmtex_uakmtex_pdtex_o

These are all excellent games–I certainly wish that I could provide ISO files for the final three games. However, for one thing, Bryan probably wouldn’t want to pay for that kind of bandwidth for his server. But, while Access is gone, Microsoft now owns the rights to at least the final three games–and, frankly, I don’t know whether they can be considered abandonware.
Look, I’m not a lawyer–I don’t even play one on TV–but here is the delineation with which I can morally and ethically live:

If one may purchase a new copy from somewhere, then it is not abandonware.

This seems to be true for Arcade ROMs, games, and other software. In conversations with Michael Verdu several years ago, I pointed out many of the Legend Entertainment games on The Home of the Underdogs, and he said that he thought it was great. They had gone through a merger of some sort and the adventure market crashed, so he was happy that people could get at his work. I can’t suss out every possible angle, but my definition holds for LucasArts games–which can apparently still be purchased new…and LucasArts appears to be delighted to sue any site that does not respond to a Cease and Desist order.

All of that is well and good, but I’m not going to go up against Microsoft for hosting Tex Murphy ISO files. 🙂

And speaking of which, now that we’ve played all of the Tex games, where are we going to go to find out what happens next? Overseer ends in a massive cliff-hanger–and we are all left in the lurch.

radiotheater

The guys from Access came to our rescue with Tex Murphy Radio Theater. Six episodes on mp3; all extremely well-made, with high production values. They take up from the end of Overseer and lead us through the first chapter of the next planned game, which may never now be produced.

Please Note: The first and last episodes have a few (short), shall we say, “racy” bits. In the first, Tex is dreaming and it actually becomes a pretty funny joke if you stick with it. The last episode, well, it is only a brief comment and it can easily be skipped. I’m not sure why they went a little over-the-top with the radio shows in comparison to the games, but I thought it would be good to offer out fair warning.  As a gauge, though, it wouldn’t raise an eyebrow on network television.

Click the play button to listen online, or download the entire mp3:

Episode 1: The Naked and the Bed

[audio:Tex Murphy Radio Theater – Episode 1.mp3]

Episode 2: The Month of the Living Dead

[audio:Tex Murphy Radio Theater – Episode 2.mp3]

Episode 3: The Monkey’s Tail

[audio:Tex Murphy Radio Theater – Episode 3.mp3]

Episode 4: Foreshadowings and a Funeral

[audio:Tex Murphy Radio Theater – Episode 4.mp3]

Episode 5: Jail, Bail, and Happy Trails

[audio:Tex Murphy Radio Theater – Episode 5.mp3]

Episode 6: Games of Chance

[audio:Tex Murphy Radio Theater – Episode 6.mp3]

I had to convert the sampling rate of Episode 6. For some reason it was released as a 32000 Hz file, and my audio player will only play standard sampling rates, so I dropped it to 22050 and it works fine. I mention this in case someone notices the difference from the original.

And now, there you have it. Apart from a few IRC interviews archived around the web, we’ve covered about all the Tex Murphy information available anywhere. I had a blast, and I hope you did too.

wc_1_box_cropendian_button

In the works for the Fourth Law:

  • Next up for Retro Gaming will be Wing Commander. These games are imminently playable on DOSBox, and are great fun. Oh, yeah, and happen to be a major slice of PC history.
  • But on the Connections side of the house, Fourth Law will bring you a step-by-step guide to really secure the home network with enterprise-class protection from Endian Community. I’m looking forward to this one. The Internet is a nasty place, and your widdle NAT-based router won’t cut it anymore, so you don’t want to miss this one.

Check back early and often!

20 Apr

Tex Murphy – Mean Streets on DOSBox Video Guide

ms02ms03ms04

Never played it. Really. But I would have loved it, if I had!

As a matter of fact, in 1989 I was concentrating on writing the half dozen term-sized papers that Ms. Stinson was pleased to assign to every Senior English class as a matter of course. So, on one hand, during my Freshman year of college while the rest of the class was freaking out about a few piddly research papers, I was thinking, “Just another day of English.” But on the other hand, I missed out on a classic game.

tex_ms1

Mean Streets was yet another ground-breaking game in Access Software’s long line of the same. It included a state-of-the-art (for the time) flight simulator engine as well as a few side-scrolling action sequences into what would ordinarily be thought of as an adventure game. So, regardless how many advertisements for the latest games talk about how New Game X is innovative for it’s cross-genre gaming, the idea is actually old hat. Truthfully, even the Zork games had RPG elements (random throws for battle damage) and Action elements (fighting that stupid dwarf)–and they were text-based games.

The sound in Mean Streets was also cutting edge. And now that I have DOSBox it is easy to replicate a PC on which the game would run natively. In almost every way, DOSBox is even better than playing games in the late ’80s. This is mainly because I am not imprisoned in a drab windowless DOS cell. But it also stems from the fact that DOSBox is so incredibly configurable. Take a look for yourself, click the video below:

ms05

For instance, Mean Streets preceded the Sound Blaster, and as such only supported RealSound via the PC speaker. According to the wiki:

RealSound is a patented technology for the PC created by Access Software during the late 1980s. RealSound enables digitized PCM-audio playback on the PC speaker. The first video games to use it were World Class Leader Board and Echelon, both released in 1988. At the time of release, sound cards were very expensive and RealSound allowed people to get life-like sounds and speech with no additional sound hardware, just the standard PC speaker.

Odd that Tex Murphy has something in common with Spellcasting 101, but Legend Entertainment evidently thought RealSound was the bee’s knees. In any case, this little factoid provides us with an interesting twist on our DOSBox setup. Perhaps not as challenging as a complex sound configuration, but interesting at least for its singularity.

It sounds remarkably good, by the way. Below is a sample of the music–I even captured some of the sound effects at the end. On 1.2MB floppies, they probably agonized over the decision to include sounds for a right and left footfall! Give it a listen:

[audio:ms01.mp3]

We will be using the following changes to the standard config file:

[render]
frameskip=1
aspect=false
scaler=normal2x[cpu]
core=dynamic
cycles=14000
cycleup=500
cycledown=20

[mixer]
nosound=false
rate=22050
blocksize=2048
prebuffer=10

[midi]
mpu401=none

[sblaster]
sbtype=none

[gus]
gus=false

[speaker]
pcspeaker=true
pcrate=22050
tandy=off
tandyrate=22050
disney=false

[dos]
xms=true
ems=false
umb=true
keyboardlayout=none

[autoexec]
mount c c:\archives\games -freesize 20
c:
cd\ms
ms

And the standard batch file of:

dosbox -conf tex_ms.conf -noconsole -exit

So, let’s run through it quickly with the video guide. As you will see, there is really minimal setup involved:

ms06

That brings us to the end of the Tex Murphy games. I have something special planned for next week to close off the chapter on Tex Murphy–check back often!

13 Apr

Tex Murphy Martian Memorandum and DOSBox Guide (Video)

The second PC game I ever purchased. After Wing Commander II, straight off the shelves of Best Buy, my hands found their way to Martian Memorandum, by Access Software. Little did I know that I was about to meet Tex Murphy for the first time.

tex_mm1

I wanted an adventure game. WC2 was fun…once I went back and bought a CH FlightStick (not the Pro version, they cost too much at the time 🙂 ). However, some of my fondest gaming memories were of adventure games on my Amiga. Now with my new PC, I once again wanted to pit my intellect against that of the game designers. I need some brain stimulation. Something that would make me think.

So, after finally removing the ugliness of OS/2 2.1 from my brand new PC, and purchasing two sound cards–the Gravis UltraSound, with which the musician in me fell in love, and the brand new Sound Blaster 16. I was ready to play.

250px-floppydrive

Good thing I had a 5 1/4″ drive…and a lot of patience. But it finally finished installing. I struggled with my sound, finally winning out, loaded up Martian Memorandum and promptly lost about a week of my life.

OK. It wasn’t the best adventure game ever made. Matter of fact…it was incredibly irritating in places. And it certainly was no Under a Killing Moon–Martian Memorandum doesn’t even begin to hold a candle to the final three Tex titles. And really, even compared with Mean Streets, the first Tex game, it comes up short. Mean Streets was actually fairly ground-breaking at the time. At this point, I’m almost wondering myself why I would bother with this game–well, two reasons. First, we need a complete chronology of Tex Murphy. We started with these guides, so we’d better be as complete as possible. Secondly, for nostalgia purposes–it really was my first PC adventure game.

If you’re coming along on the Martian Memorandum trail with me, you’re going to need some things.

  1. DOSBox: If you’ve followed the other guides on The Fourth Law, you already have it. Just download it and install it.
  2. Martian Memorandum: This game is abandonware, and available from several places. Personally, I love The Underdogs.
  3. ConTEXT: Well, you don’t really need this one. Yet it’s one of the best editors out there, and, unlike UltraEdit, ConTEXT is free.

Hey! It says “video” in the title, right? Well, as long as DOSBox is installed on the system, we’re ready. Let’s get right to it–click on the video file below:

mm01

Really quickly, here are config file changes we made in the video:

[render]
frameskip=1
aspect=false
scaler=normal2x

[cpu]
core=dynamic
cycles=14000

cycleup=500
cycledown=20

[mixer]
nosound=false
rate=22050
blocksize=2048
prebuffer=10

[midi]
mpu401=intelligent
device=default
config=

[sblaster]
sbtype=sb16
sbbase=220
irq=7
dma=1
hdma=5
mixer=true
oplmode=auto
oplrate=22050

[gus]
gus=false
gusrate=22050
gusbase=240
irq1=5
irq2=5
dma1=3
dma2=3
ultradir=C:\ULTRASND

[speaker]
pcspeaker=false
pcrate=22050
tandy=off
tandyrate=22050
disney=false

[autoexec]
mount c c:\Archives\games -freesize 20
c:
cd\mm
mm

My changes are in italics.

All in all, this one is a good game to take on the road and play back in the room. Here is the result:

mm02

Thanks for watching! If you like the article, please comment or better yet, submit me to digg. Or best yet, both! 🙂

Along these lines, just found a great gaming community at Subgamers.com.  I’m new there, but it seems to be a very active site with deep info in the forums.  Check it out.

See you, Space Cowboy.

06 Apr

Tex Murphy, DOSBox, and the Gravis UltraSound 16

gus

I had just purchased my first PC after years of loving my Amiga. It was 1992, and after much pouring over the Sunday BestBuy inserts, I finally purchased. At over $3000, I received an IBM4019 laser printer, a 14″-ish monitor, and an IBM 486DX/33 PS/1 with 8MB of RAM (standard was 2 or maybe 4) and a 210MB hard drive.

Naturally, this machine was preloaded with OS/2, and didn’t come with drivers for the printer (which was part of the package). And, as was common, there was no sound card. So, back to BestBuy I go…and based upon specs alone, I purchased a Gravis UltraSound. I was a clean slate–I had no knowledge or preconceptions about the PC sound card market of the time.

I didn’t even realize how lame OS/2 2.1 was, either, I guess I had heard the name Windows, before–but OS/2 had Windows built right in! What a noob. Wing Commander II ran fine under OS/2, but there was no way I could find to get the game sound to play through my spanking new sound card. Many calls to IBM later, they finally just sent me a set of DOS/Windows reinstall disks. Finally! Things worked. Sorta.

gus_card

“Advanced Gravis taught me how to use a computer!”

They didn’t intend to…it was just that the GUS had absolutely zero native support in games. Sure it sounded far superior to the SB16 I purchased later in a fit of pique (Forgive me, Gravis!), but I wanted to play games!!! Particularly the only two I owned–Wing Commander II and, ironically enough, Martian Memorandum.

wingiitex_mm2

And to top it all off, the IBM install booted directly to Windows, and when you exited would take the machine to a bizarre DOS Shell application that would ask if you wanted to go back to Windows or maybe the DOS SHELL…which wasn’t DOS. It was some ANSI based file manager. But I stated to learn the ways of the PC world.

But, let’s use some of those fantastic MIDI patches in our DOSBox games!

dosboxlogo

To start, one will need a DOSBox install and a game. For the purpose of this posting, we will continue from my previous guide and utilize the setup for DOSBox and Under a Killing Moon (the third in the Tex Murphy series). Read the article in its full form here on the Fourth Law to catch up.

And go ahead and start downloading the GUS install diskettes.

Ok, here’s the trickiest part (not really)–unzip them all into the same folder. Let it overwrite the text file each time.

gus01

gus02

gus03

Now, we get to install the GUS software where DOSBox can get at it. Open up a command prompt, change to the directory where the files were unzipped, and execute INSTALL.EXE. Step-by-step:

  1. Start | Run | CMD <enter>
  2. CD\<path to install files>
  3. INSTALL <enter>

There is no way to use the regular installation script, since part of it will try to detect the hardware–which isn’t there. Therefore, we will use “Restore File(s)”.

gus04

Tell it to restore everything using wildcards. Type *.* for the selection. Oh, and don’t forget to mail in your UltraSound registration!

gus05

When it asks, tell it to install to the C: drive. A security warning message will probably appear, just tell it yes.

gus06

gus07

Allow it just to install to the default directory. The plan is to move it to a location that DOSBox will use as its root.

gus08

Once that is complete, exit from the install program and the command prompt. Now, in Windows, explore to C:\ULTRASND, grab the folder and move it to the root of your games directory (or where ever DOSBox maps as its C: drive). In my case, this is C:\Archives\Games.

gus09

DOSBox, meet the GUS. GUS, p0wn the DOSBox.

Now Remember: Since we are emulating more digital audio rather than just passing MIDI calls to the Windows MIDI mapper, this setup hinders the performance of DOSBox.

Open the DOSBox config file–which, if my previous guide is being followed, is called TEX_UAKM.CONF. We will first turn off the MPU-401 interface. Under the midi section, let’s change it from “intelligent” to “none”.

[midi]
mpu401=none

Make sure that the sbtype=none and the GUS emulation is turned on.

[gus]
gus=true
gusrate=22050
gusbase=240
irq1=5
irq2=5
dma1=3
dma2=3
ultradir=C:\ULTRASND

Save the config and launch it with DOSBox.

Alright! Now let’s play the classic file HIDNSEEK.MID using the UltraSound MIDI Player. I know, I know–but it still gives me goosebumps, probably only for nostalgic reasons. These sounds being produced by my 486 simply knocked me out at the time. I didn’t really think a PC could produce audio at that level. Comparing it to the other 16bit cards of the day, even the Wave Blaster SB16 daughter board, the sound quality was unbelievable.

And it was second to none for Digital Audio playback (not that it matters here–since it is only being emulated).

Try it out! From the DOSBox command prompt:

  1. CD\ULTRASND <enter>
  2. PLAYMIDI <enter>
  3. Select the MIDI directory

gus10

This is just a little DOS application for play .MID files. The General MIDI specification (GM) required 16 channels, and utilized volume levels from 0 to 127. In case anyone wonders, the volumes per channel are shown on the right, and the pitch is on the left. Escape exits, if you need it.

gus11

w00t. Now, for Tex Murphy. This actually stopped me for a little while. I simply could not get the MIDI card setup inside UAKM to detect the UltraSound. Then, something at the edge of my memory caused me to more closely examine the Tex Murphy UAKM install directory.

Sure enough! MOONGRAV.BAT…for playing Under a Killing Moon with a GRAVis card. Duh!

It simply uses an Advanced Gravis utility to preload the MIDI patches into the sound card’s on-board RAM before the game starts. It has a bunch of echo lines and a pause in it, but the meat of it are these two lines:

loadpats mem1
TEX3 %1 %2 %3 %4 %5

I don’t know why it is passing all five arguments to the EXE in the second line, but I know we will need to make some changes to this file. For one thing, we don’t want to emulate the stock GUS that shipped with only 256k of RAM, we want to emulate one that the owner has painstakingly filled up to a megabyte. And when I say “painstakingly”, I speak from experience. They didn’t just sell those SOJ modules anywhere. And also, we need to run the patched file TEX197 rather that the original TEX3 executable.

Anyway, open up MOONGRAV.BAT from your UAKM directory and edit the last two lines thusly:

loadpats mem4
TEX197 %1 %2 %3 %4 %5

And now, run MOONGRAV.BAT. It will take a second to load the patches. Tex will start, but complain that the MIDI card has not been configured.

uakm20

Just set it up as we did in the last post (I/O Port 240) and away we go.

uakm21

Tex on a GUS. Now that’s living the life!

Hope this helps! Have fun revisiting the olden days. If you really want to tweak, here’s a copy of the last version of MegaEm for GUS and the PROPATS bundle of patch replacements.

03 Apr

Tex Murphy Under a Killing Moon – DOSBox Guide (No CDs)

When last we met our hero, he was struggling in vain to hear the sweet jazz stylings of James Earl Jones as the Great Detective in the Sky. “Why, oh, why aren’t DOS legacy sound drivers a requirement of WQHL certification?” he lamented…

uakm-box

I was working 3rd Shift (11:00pm to 7:00am) when I first saw Under a Killing Moon. And, as one might imagine, I had a great deal of spare time on my hands. A perfect situation for an adventure game that was fun, and most importantly, had serious plot-depth. I can even remember the PC Gaming articles, remarking that it was a game with chuztspa to recommend 4 CDROM drives and a 486DX/66 just to get the full experience. And really, it has only been out-paced by hardware in the last 4 or 5 years–which is frankly remarkable for a game that was released in 1994!

uakm01uakm02

This unique game was an instant classic, and should always be mentioned with the top-shelf of classic games that truly innovated the adventure genre. So, in my mind, Tex Murphy always keeps company with King’s Quest, Myst, and Zork. UAKM was the first game to take a fully navigable 3D environment and interweave it with full-motion video. This created a result that far beyond just a gimmick, but instead transformed itself into a new genre of gaming. Personally, I would trace the Thief games and System Shock II back to this early beginning.

But how do I play it today?

I’m here to help. This is the 3rd of my Tex Murphy Guide articles, here on the Fourth Law. I’ve dealt with the hardest to run of the series, Pandora Directive. We’ve seen Overseer running pretty well in XP. And now, I’ll swing around to the original, ground-breaking game, Under a Killing Moon. It runs extremely well on DOSBox with modern hardware, just like Pandora Directive. So, if you have read my article on PD, then you can probably quickly adapt the same techniques to UAKM and get going (don’t forget the patch).

gus1

But, I’m going to dig a little deeper and go for the ultimate retro experience (at least for me), and setup Under a Killing Moon to use the Advanced Gravis UltraSound 16 for audio and MIDI music. Just playing the demo MID files from the GUS install disks was such a nostalgic experience it almost physically disoriented me. Ah, HIDNSEEK.MID, how I loved thee…

I still have two GUS16s (1024K and 512K) at home, and an official GUS MIDI/Joystick breakout cable. Had to special order it from Gravis…I think the made them by hand or something 🙂

Just to be clear, here, this will actually take a chunk back from the performance of the game. Therefore, I will demonstrate how to just use the General MIDI interface as well, which I believe maps directly to the XP MIDI Mapper. The General MIDI interface in DOSBox will be much more efficient–so it should probably be used to play through UAKM. Anyway, we’ll do both–GM for performance, and GUS for old skool fun. However, due to the length of this post I am going to add the GUS guide as a Part 2.

First order of business, obtain a copy of the game. I suggest eBay for this one. Amazon will occasionally have a used copy, but they seem scarce there. So get one…and even a few scratches won’t be a big deal, as part of the process will be imaging the CDs to the hard drive–which usually mitigates those scratches that cause the optical reader fits. To do this, we’ll once again tap Alex Feinman’s ISO Recorder Power Toy. This free tool simply creates ISO files from CDs or DVDs. Place each disk into the drive, right-click on the drive and select Create Image from CD.

iso_1

Then store it someplace handy. I suggest creating an ISO directory using game name to keep them all separate. And just for simplicity’s sake, use director names without spaces in them. Spaces seem to bug DOSBox. For instance:

C:\archives\iso\disk1.iso

iso_2

Now that we have our ISO images, we can move onto DOSBox itself.

dosboxlogo1

Download the most current version. In this guide, I’ll be using 0.70, but the config files appear to be backward compatible. Let it install with all the defaults. I’ll do a little cut and paste from the PD guide: After it is installed, browse out to the folder C:\Program Files\DOSBox-0.70\ and look inside. It wouldn’t hurt to read the README.TXT, but we’ll skip it for now.

To follow my method, we’ll be creating a pair of text files. The first one is called tex_uakm.bat and will easily launch our DOSBox session with our choice of command-line switches. For the second file, copy the default dosbox.conf to a new file called tex_uakm.conf. This file will contain all the sound card, cpu, and memory settings required to run the game, and will also mount all of our ISO images as CD drives.

I have my ISO files in C:\archives\iso\tex\uakm\ so, obviously, the bit at the end may need to be changed to the proper location. Here are links to copies of my own files:

tex_uakm.conf
tex_uakm.bat

However, since you are probably here partly for the challenge of beating a DOS game into submission, let’s briefly go through the changes to the config. This will be helpful later should you decide to go on and setup the GUS MIDI or play another game entirely.

I’m going to start with the section called RENDER. This is a change from the previous guide, but after some testing with .070 there seems no need for some of the settings. Just set frameskip to 1 from the default of 0, which serves to smooth things out a bit.

[render]
frameskip=1

Now to one of the most critical spots. CPU core will default to auto, but I force it to stay in dynamic. Also, pay close attention to where the cycles setting is. This is the one we’ll have to tweak to get a good Tex experience. Is that a “Texperience”?

[cpu]
core=dynamic
cycles=14000

Let’s go ahead and address this here. Essentially this: Start at around 12000 or 14000 and move it up at 1000 cycle intervals until the game gets as fast as possible, but doesn’t cook the sound or tear the video. In other words, once the process of installing the game and setting up the sound is complete, this configuration file needs to be edited, this number changed, the file saved, and the game tested. It will take some time, but it is the only way the optimum performance can be dialed in for each individual computer system.

There are no changes to the Mixer section, but I wanted to point out the rate setting…this can be lowered if you really need the performance, but if that has to be done, you might be wasting your time on slow hardware. This shouldn’t make enough difference on a modern machine to be the sliver bullet that takes you from an unplayable choppy mess to silky smooth gaming delight. Oh, and the nosound may seem counter-intuitive: make sure it is false if you do, in fact, want sound.

[mixer]
nosound=false
rate=22050

Defaults are fine for the MIDI section. (If planning to GUS it up, keep a mental note on this section.)

[midi]
mpu401=intelligent
device=default
config=

Here’s some changes from the Pandora Directive Guide, turn off the Sound Blaster emulation:

[sblaster]
sbtype=none

And turn on the GUS! w00t!

[gus]
gus=true

gusrate=22050
gusbase=240
irq1=5
irq2=5
dma1=3
dma2=3
ultradir=C:\ULTRASND

Turn off the PC speaker, Disney Sound Source, Tandy, Joystick, and stuff:

[speaker]
pcspeaker=none
pcrate=22050
tandy=off
tandyrate=22050
disney=false[joystick]
joysticktype=none

The defaults are fine for all the rest, but let’s turn off Extended Memory (EMS):

[dos]
xms=true
ems=false
umb=true
keyboardlayout=none

Lastly, I’ll add a few lines to the Autoexec section to mount our ISO images. Change this to reflect the proper location, if needed:

[autoexec]
# Lines in this section will be run at startup.
mount c c:\Archives\games -freesize 20
imgmount D “c:\archives\iso\tex\uakm\disk1.iso” -t iso
imgmount E “c:\archives\iso\tex\uakm\disk2.iso” -t iso
imgmount F “c:\archives\iso\tex\uakm\disk3.iso” -t iso
imgmount G “c:\archives\iso\tex\uakm\disk4.iso” -t iso
c:
cd\moon
#tex197

If you’re keeping score at home, you might notice that the last line has a # in front of it to comment it out–basically telling DOSBox to skip this line. We will want to take that out later after we complete the installation and patch. Save this file as tex_uakm.conf and then create a batch file with the following lines:

@echo off
dosbox -conf tex_uakm.conf -noconsole -fullscreen -exit

And save it as tex_uakm.bat. Now we’re ready to install Under a Killing Moon, so run the batch file. It should place us in the C:\MOON directory. Type in SETUP and hit enter. Edit:  I made a big mistake here–thanks to Detray for discovering it! Change to the D: drive (or whichever letter is mapped to the ISO of the first CD) and run SETUP.EXE.  In other words, at the C: prompt, type:

D: <enter>
SETUP <enter>

And the following screen should appear.

uakm01a1

Pretty obvious, click Install Software.

uakm02a

Click OK to accept the defaults. Notice all 4 of your virtual CD-ROM drives! 🙂

uakm03

Confirm the path.

uakm04

And now, we patch. Download this file and just unzip it into the game directory.

uakm05

Let’s setup the game!

uakm06

Click OK, and let it Autodetect.

uakm07

Click Auto Detect for the tenth time and one should see the following results–matching the DOSBox config. Port 240, IRQ 5, DMA 1.

uakm08

uakm09

Click the Sound Test to hear Tex say

“Prophecy is not in my job description. I’m just a humble P.I. trying to save the world as we know it.”

uakm10

Now to the MIDI setup:, click Continue:

uakm11

uakm12

Here is where we will use the General MIDI interface for performance reasons, and set the port to 330. Change the settings and test the sound. Some film noir jazz should be pounding from the speakers.

uakm13

Lastly, let’s take advantage of UAKM’s interface that allows us to use 4 CD drives.

If the goal is to get UAKM setup and running, this is where you can leave us. Click OK, select New Game, and save the world!

Stay tuned for the Ultimate DOSBox Gravis UltraSound 16 and Tex Murphy Under a Killing Moon installation guide!

Hope this helps–if it does, please comment or digg it!