Buried In Time – Running in Windows XP/Vista/7

Buried In Time – Running in Windows XP/Vista/7

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his is the second game in the Journeyman Project trilogy.  And, for me, the most memorable.  The artwork seems a bit dated now, but at the time of release it looked beautiful to me.  The acting didn’t bother me either…back then.  Now, well, any time an actor (in this case the main character) stops to smack his lips between phrases, you know you’re in for a treat!  The best part was the news editorial that was in no way editorial–the “news anchor” had no opinion of anything.  He just reported what other people thought.  Fortunately, the player may suffer through the video clips early on in the game and leave them far behind.

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All-in-all, though, the game excells in story–marginalizing even these minor criticisms.

However, getting it to run under a modern version of Windows proved more challenging than I expected.  Two issues immediately presented:

  • Some monitors and/or video cards no longer support 640×480 resolution natively…or so it would appear.
  • The game hangs on disc changes, probably due to power consumption features of many laptops and desktops.

The goal is the make the game playable on a modern system and not have to swap discs.  Fortunately, the path to victory here turns out relatively short.  Install the game, install the patch, configure settings for Win95 compatibility, image the CD-ROMS, load the images, and edit the registry.  Simple, right?  :)

First

Install the game.  Simply insert Disc 1 and let it go.

Second

Install the Win95 upgrade patch.  Not only does this seem to help overall performance, but evidently the game cannot complete without it.  And that would be a true bummer.

Third

Configure the Windows 95 compatibility mode.  Make sure that it runs in 640 x 480.  Right-click on the Buried in Time shortcut (the new one created after the Win95 patch). and select Properties.  Go to the Compatibility tab.

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Fourth

Using Alex Feinman’s tools, image the CD-ROMs to ISO files and store them someplace safe.  I have a post on that with more detail.  (Please note, that the post recommends the Microsoft Virtual CD Tools–now I recommend using VirtualCloneDrive.  See next step.)

Fifth

Using SlySoft’s VirtualCloneDrive, create 3 virtual drives, and mount the images.

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Sixth

Now, edit the registry so Buried in Time knows where to find the CD-ROMs.

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[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Presto Studios\Buried in Time\1.1]
“CD Path 1″=”D:\\”
“CD Path 2″=”E:\\”
“CD Path 3″=”F:\\”

If you run into other issues, try this troubleshooting guide.  The same site has some Buried in Time hints and solves.

Good luck!

2 Comments

  1. Dori
    Aug 17, 2009

    Thanks. That tip about editing the registy really made my life easier.
    But my game still have occasional CTD – usually at the same places, like in the nexus in Farnstein lab or when looking at the tank drawings in Da Vinci studio.
    Is there any way to fix that?

    By the way, I’m running it on Vista, it works fine when I launch it normally but when trying to use Win95 compatibility it crashes when I open the save/load menu.

  2. E
    Aug 27, 2009

    I have the same CTD problem in Nexus. Actually, it freezes without crashing. I’m using Virtual PC 2007 with Windows 98. First time I froze at Nexus, I hadn’t saved in a while, so I shut down the emulator with “save state” and reloaded and it loaded up fine without the freeze. But I tested to try to duplicate the problem, and it almost always freezes when I enter the A.I. Nexus. Only one time it didn’t out of about 20 tries. I downloaded a DVD version of the game, but it might be a fake DVD version with just the 3 CDs thrown on a single disc image. I was wondering if that was the problem. I own the Mac version, but Mac emulators are a pain to get working so I decided to try the Windows version.